Signature Smiles Dental Care
1128 Lake Street Suite 1
Oak Park, IL 60301
(708) 386-6190

Archive:

Tags

[email protected]

APPLY NOW for special financing opportunities by clicking the button below:

Posts for: March, 2013

By Signature Smiles Dental Care, Ltd
March 26, 2013
Category: Oral Health
ThumbSuckingHarmlessHabitorPotentialProblem

For many parents, the image of an infant intently absorbed in sucking a pacifier — or her own thumb — is one of the cherished memories of babyhood. But if this habit goes on for too long, it can cause problems with the child's bite. Want to know what the potential predicaments are, when you should be concerned about the behavior, and what you can do? Read on!

Thumb sucking is a natural, comforting behavior of humans (and some other primates) related to nursing. It usually goes away on its own by the time the permanent teeth are coming in. But it can be a hard habit to break — and if it becomes a persistent behavior, the consequences may include a problem called an “open bite.”

In a normal bite, the top teeth slightly overlap the bottom teeth. When the thumb (or any other object) constantly rests between the upper and lower teeth, however, the pressure it exerts may prevent the teeth from fully erupting (coming out from the gums into the mouth) and alter the shape and development of the upper and lower jawbone. This result is a gap between the upper and lower teeth.

The same problem may also be caused by prolonging the “infantile swallowing pattern,” a forward-thrusting position of the tongue which, like thumb sucking, normally begins to cease around age four. That's when it is replaced by the adult swallowing pattern, where the tongue is held behind the teeth, against the roof on the mouth. Researchers believe that most open bites result from the failure to change from the infantile to the adult swallowing pattern.

When should you be concerned about the thumb sucking habit? If the behavior continues much past toddlerhood, or if the sucking is particularly active, you may wish to have us evaluate your child's bite. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends having the habit stop by age 3. Persistent thumb sucking can actually push the teeth forward and change the growth patterns of the jaw, creating more difficult problems.

There are several methods for controlling the behavior and correcting problems with the bite. One is an appliance called a “tongue crib.” This thin metal device is placed behind the upper and lower incisors. It discourages thumb sucking, while at the same time helping to keep the tongue from inserting itself between the upper and lower teeth. Eliminating these unhelpful habits is essential to allow the teeth to erupt into proper position and to allow for the normal development of the jawbones.

Recent research has also shown that individualized exercise routines called orofacial myofunctional therapy (OMT) can be highly effective in preventing open bite relapses. These exercises are designed to retrain muscles in the face, tongue and lips, and can help to create good chewing and swallowing patterns.

If you would like more information about thumb sucking or children's bite problems, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about these issues by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Thumb Sucking Affects The Bite.”


By Signature Smiles Dental Care, Ltd
March 18, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
HowDoWeMakeYourDentalImplantsLookSoGood

A dental implant as a permanent replacement for a missing tooth can match or even look better than your original tooth. How this happens takes knowledge, skill, experience, and even some art.

Here are some of the factors involved:

  1. Bone quantity and quality: To look and function like an original tooth, an implant must be supported by an adequate base of (jaw) bone and gum tissue. Bone has a tendency to melt away or resorb after a tooth is lost. Using new bone grafting techniques can help minimize the bone loss that occurs during healing at the extraction site. Bone grafting can also be used to rebuild lost bone at the implant site.
  2. Adequate bone supporting neighboring teeth: If you lose bone that supports teeth on either side of an implant, the papillae (the little pink triangles of gum tissue between the teeth) may not regenerate after the implant is placed.
  3. Your inborn tissue type: If your gum tissues are thin and delicate rather than thick and robust, they will be more difficult to work with. To ensure that there is sufficient gum tissue support, (gum) grafting may be necessary.
  4. Using the temporary crown as a template: A dental implant actually replaces a tooth root. Most dental implants are made of commercially pure titanium, which fuses with the bone in your jaw, making it very stable. The crown, the part of the tooth that is visible above the gum line, is attached to the implant; a customized temporary crown can be fitted to the implant. The temporary crown is a trial for the final crown. It can be used to assess color, shape, the appearance of your smile, and the implantâ??s function in your bite and speech. It gives you the opportunity to decide about design adjustments before the final, permanent crown is placed.
  5. The skill, experience, and collaboration of your dental team: Each situation is different. The final success of your implant depends on your pre-surgical assessment and diagnosis, as well as how the surgical and restorative phases of treatment are performed. The use of an outstanding dental laboratory is vital to a successful result.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment for an assessment or to discuss your questions about dental implants. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Matching Teeth & Implants.”


By Signature Smiles Dental Care, Ltd
March 07, 2013
Category: Oral Health
SleepApnea-aHiddenDanger

Nightly snoring can be a sign of a dangerous condition called sleep apnea (from “a” meaning without and “pnea” meaning breath). When someone snores the soft tissues in the back of the throat collapse onto themselves and obstruct the airway, causing the vibration known as snoring.

If the obstruction becomes serious, it is called obstructive sleep apnea, or OSA. In such cases the flow of air may be stopped for brief periods, causing the person to wake for a second or two with a loud gasp as he attempts to catch his breath. This can cause heart and blood pressure problems, related to low oxygen levels in the blood. The obstruction and mini-awakening cycle can occur as many as 50 times an hour. A person with this condition awakens tired and faces the risk of accidents at work or while driving due to fatigue.

Studies show that sleep apnea patients are much more likely to suffer from heart attack, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, brain damage and strokes.

What can be done to treat OSA?
Snoring, apnea, and OSA occur more frequently in people who are overweight. So start with losing weight and exercising.

At our office, we can design oral appliances to wear while sleeping that will keep your airway open while you sleep. These appliances, which look like sports mouth guards, work by repositioning the lower jaw, tongue, soft palate and uvula (soft tissues in the back of the throat); stabilizing the lower jaw and tongue; and increasing the muscle tone of the tongue.

Another approach is to use a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) bedside machine. These machines send pressurized air through a tube connected to a mask covering the nose and sometimes the mouth. The pressurized air opens the airway so that breathing is not interrupted.

Much less frequently, jaw surgeries may be recommended to remove excess tissues in the throat. These would be done by specially trained oral surgeons or ear, nose and throat specialists.

Diagnosis and treatment of OSA is best accomplished by joint consultation with your physician and our office. Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss snoring and OSA. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Sleep Disorders and Dentistry” and “Snoring and Sleep Apnea.”