Signature Smiles Dental Care
1128 Lake Street Suite 1
Oak Park, IL 60301
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Posts for: November, 2013

By Signature Smiles Dental Care, Ltd
November 26, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: missing teeth  
ReplacingMissingBackTeethDeservesaHighPriority

For most people, replacing missing front teeth takes a higher priority over missing back teeth. The reason is obvious: others can see those missing in front, but not necessarily those in the back.

From a functional view, however, you should still consider replacing missing back teeth. Not only will it improve your chewing ability, it may also prevent a chain reaction of negative effects to your remaining teeth.

Teeth are held in place in the jawbone by a membrane called the periodontal ligament. The ligament is a living tissue that allows teeth to move to keep contact with adjacent and opposing teeth as natural wear occurs. When a space is created by a missing tooth, this natural movement accelerates and the teeth may shift beyond normal ranges.

As a result you can encounter excessive mobility of teeth from bite irregularities, uneven tooth wear, bone loss, potential painful problems with the temporo-mandibular joints (connecting the lower jaw to the skull), and a loss in facial height.

There are three basic options for this kind of tooth replacement. The best option is dental implants: these free-standing replacements don't normally affect surrounding teeth, they're easier to clean, and they help support the bite. On the downside, there must be enough remaining bone to support the implant.

The next best option is a fixed bridge. This option only works, however, if there are teeth on either side of the missing tooth space capable of supporting the bridge, and they must be reduced in size by removing the enamel with the dental drill. They also have a tendency to retain plaque, the main cause of gum disease.

That leaves the last, and least favorable, option, a removable partial denture. They may also trap food and be difficult to wear. They can move in the mouth, stressing — and possibly loosening — the remaining teeth that hold them in place. With all its drawbacks, though, if a partial denture is the only solution to missing back teeth, it's a better alternative than doing nothing and risking long-term problems.

If you would like more information on replacement options for back teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Replacing Back Teeth.”


By Signature Smiles Dental Care, Ltd
November 18, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
LooseDentures-NoMore

The image of Grandma and Grandpa taking out their dentures every night and placing them in a glass of water by the bed is still a reality for a lot of people.

If you have dentures, you probably know that the conditions in your mouth will or have changed over time, necessitating adjustments. This is because full dentures exert continuous pressure on the gum tissues and underlying bone of your jaw resulting in a slow shrinkage. The gum tissues, and the bone beneath, atrophy or melt away. The result — over time the dentures lose their original tight fit and become loose. This can cause discomfort and embarrassment as the dentures slip and slide around.

Reline (refit) your current dentures. If your dentures are in good condition and are functional, applying a new inner lining to the dentures will restore their former fit. Because the rate of bone loss differs from person to person, some denture wearers may need more frequent relines than others. A temporary reline involves adding a layer of moldable plastic material under the denture while you are in the dentist's chair. The material will harden and fill in spaces where the gums have shrunk away from the denture. For a more permanent relining, the dentures must be sent to a dental lab, which will replace the temporary material with permanent denture material. This can usually be done in one day.

A new set of dentures. If your dentures are worn or you cannot speak, eat, bite or chew properly with them, a new set of dentures may be the answer. The condition of your jaw is another factor. If examination shows that a reline will not achieve the fit and stability you need, then remaking the dentures is another option.

Dental Implants — State-of-the-art tooth replacement systems. Dentures used to be the only solution to the problem of missing teeth, but with today's technology it's amazing what dentists can do. Implants do not only replace teeth but also stabilize the gradual bone loss that takes place when teeth are missing. Choose dental implants to replace at least two of your missing teeth to anchor your dentures and make them more stable.

Have all your missing teeth replaced with dental implants. Dental implants are generally the best option for long-term denture wearers who have endured jawbone loss and can no longer tolerate dentures alone. Bridgework (or dentures) are attached to the implants, stabilizing them and the underlying bone. The new teeth also provide support to the face, lips and cheeks giving a more youthful appearance.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about dentures and other tooth restorations. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Loose Dentures.”


By Signature Smiles Dental Care, Ltd
November 15, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: tooth extraction  
HavingaToothRemovedisaNo-AnxietyAffair

Many people view a tooth extraction (removal) as a major ordeal; but from a dentist’s standpoint it’s a routine procedure. That’s not to say, though, that all extractions are alike — there are varying levels of complexity depending on the type, size and location of the tooth.

Teeth are held in place to the jawbone by a tissue known as the periodontal ligament, whose collagen fibers attach the tooth to the bone of the jaws. By gently manipulating the tooth, we can release the hold that these fibers have on the tooth. This takes not only skill but also a kind of “feel” that comes with experience.

From that point, removing the tooth will depend on its root structure and how it’s positioned in the jaw. Upper front teeth have a single, straight root usually shaped like a cone; their path of removal is relatively straight and uncomplicated. Many teeth in the back, however, have more than one root, and not as straight in shape as an upper front tooth, that complicates the path of removal. Depending on the level of complication, the extraction may require an oral surgeon, a dental specialist.

After the tooth is extracted, it may be necessary to fill the socket (the area of the bone once occupied by the tooth) with some form of grafting material that will encourage bone growth. This new growth will aid with any future plans for dental implants.

After the procedure, we will give you instructions for cleaning and caring for the extraction site as you recover over the next few days. We may also prescribe medications to help you cope with discomfort and swelling, as well as antibiotics and antibacterial mouth rinses.

Before undertaking any extraction, we would first conduct a thorough examination and provide you with your options and our recommendations for treatment. We would also discuss your options for replacing the teeth after theyĆ¢??ve been extracted.

The thought of having an extraction may fill you with anxiety. But in the hands of an experienced professional, removing a tooth is a routine and safe procedure.

If you would like more information on tooth extractions, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Simple Tooth Extraction?


By Signature Smiles Dental Care, Ltd
November 07, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gummy smile  
TreatingaGummySmileDependsonitsCause

Something about your smile isn’t quite right. It’s too “gummy” — too much of the upper gum line is visible and it looks out of proportion to your teeth and lips. Most dentists identify a smile as too gummy if four millimeters or more (approximately an eighth of an inch) of the gum tissue is visible at a full smile.

Fortunately, there are ways to minimize this effect. It’s important, though, to first determine the true cause before we embark on any treatment plan.

Your teeth may be the actual cause. As we mature, teeth “erupt” through the gums and the supporting bone and appear in the mouth. They continue to erupt until meeting their “antagonists,” the opposing teeth from the opposite jaw. In addition, the gums go to the proper position where the root meets the enamel of the teeth around late adolescence. The normal result is a length of the crown (the visible portion of the tooth) of approximately 10 mm.

If the teeth don’t erupt fully or the gums don’t go to their proper position, the teeth appear shorter and the gums more prominent. Using a surgical technique called crown lengthening, we remove excess gum tissue and, if necessary, reshape the underlying bone to reveal the proper amount of tooth length. Teeth also shorten due to excessive wear; the teeth continue to erupt to compensate for the wear that occurs over time. The attached gum tissue follows with the tooth. This can be corrected with orthodontic treatment (for bite correction) and porcelain veneers.

Two more causes of a gummy smile are when a person has a hyper-mobile upper lip — the upper lip can raise too much lift when smiling — and an upper jaw length that appears too long for the face. If lips rise higher than the normal 6-8 mm when we smile, too much of the gum line appears. This can be treated temporarily with Botox injections to reduce the mobility of the muscles, or there is a surgical procedure that reduces the mobility of the upper lip. For an elongated upper jaw, orthognathic (“to straighten the jaw”) surgery relocates the jaw to a more upward position that diminishes the amount of gum tissue that shows during smiling.

Treatments for a gummy smile range from simple techniques to more complex surgical procedures. Only a thorough dental exam will reveal the best treatment path to follow.

If you would like more information on treatments for “gummy” smiles, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Gummy Smiles.”